Some of the most fas­cin­at­ing video anim­at­ors I’ve ever seen — Cyriak (Brighton, UK), Fernando Livschitz (Buenos Aires, Argen­tina) and Till Nowak (Ham­burg, Ger­many). Using found foot­age and masks, they cre­ate a sur­real and often dis­turb­ing view of reality.

As men­tioned in the ‘Her­oes of Anim­a­tion film’, Cyriak sees this style as a nat­ur­al evol­u­tion of the Terry Gil­li­am school — tak­ing pho­to­graph­ic ele­ments and mov­ing them in unex­pec­ted ways. I would go fur­ther and in that it takes Rus­si­an Con­struct­iv­ist fine-art pho­tomont­age to a nat­ur­al conclusion.

We are so used to ama­teur cam­cord­er and mobile films these days that this approach seems to tran­scend anim­a­tion — and we are drawn into their world.

We are so used to ama­teur cam­cord­er and mobile video these days that this approach seems to even tran­scend anim­a­tion — and we are drawn into their world. So much so that The Insti­tute for Cent­ri­fu­gal Research seems to be (remotely) plausible.

And here’s how it’s done.

This pro­file of Cyriak includes a his­tory of his work, and a demon­stra­tion of his pro­cess. This behind-the-scenes video from The Cent­ri­fuge Brain Pro­ject shows the CGI over­laid over the source foot­age, and this After Effects tutori­al explains the basics, using a locked-off cam­era (then you can add nat­ur­al cam­era move­ment afterwards).