Some of the most fas­ci­nat­ing video ani­ma­tors I’ve ever seen — Cyr­i­ak (Brighton, UK), Fer­nan­do Livschitz (Buenos Aires, Argenti­na) and Till Nowak (Ham­burg, Ger­many). Using found footage and masks, they cre­ate a sur­re­al and often dis­turb­ing view of real­i­ty.

As men­tioned in the ‘Heroes of Ani­ma­tion film’, Cyr­i­ak sees this style as a nat­ur­al evo­lu­tion of the Ter­ry Gilliam school — tak­ing pho­to­graph­ic ele­ments and mov­ing them in unex­pect­ed ways. I would go fur­ther and in that it takes Russ­ian Con­struc­tivist fine-art pho­tomon­tage to a nat­ur­al con­clu­sion.

We are so used to ama­teur cam­corder and mobile films these days that this approach seems to tran­scend ani­ma­tion — and we are drawn into their world.

We are so used to ama­teur cam­corder and mobile video these days that this approach seems to even tran­scend ani­ma­tion — and we are drawn into their world. So much so that The Insti­tute for Cen­trifu­gal Research seems to be (remote­ly) plau­si­ble.

And here’s how it’s done.

This pro­file of Cyr­i­ak includes a his­to­ry of his work, and a demon­stra­tion of his process. This behind-the-scenes video from The Cen­trifuge Brain Project shows the CGI over­laid over the source footage, and this After Effects tuto­r­i­al explains the basics, using a locked-off cam­era (then you can add nat­ur­al cam­era move­ment after­wards).